Moths at the Back Porch

A couple of nights ago, a muggy late May night, a lovely lime green Luna Moth (Actias luna) appeared at my back door.  I love the brilliant colors of the Luna Moth, so I quickly grabbed my camera and snapped a few photos.  I also took a few pictures of the other moths that had congregated- including a Banded Tussock Moth (Halysidota tessellaris).


The following night, a Rosy Maple Moth (Dryocampa rubicundaappeared.  I again hurriedly snatched up the camera and began snapping pics.  There aren't many bright pink or lime green animals or insects in nature- so this was quite a treat.

Also kind of cool is the super tiny  Moth Fly (Psychodinae) which shares a photo with the Grape Leaffolder Moth in a photo below.  The Moth Fly is a fly that resembles a moth and not a moth that resembles a fly, as I had supposed.

Fun Facts:
  • Both the Luna Moth and the Rosy Maple Moth belong to the same family of insects- the Saturniidae - Giant Silkworm and Royal Moths family.   This family includes many other brilliantly colored moths.
  • An adult Luna moth doesn't have mouth parts, so consequently, it doesn't eat and typically only lives for about a week.  It lives just long enough to mate.
  • My friend, and fellow blogger, Eve Sweatman (http://sunnysideup-eve.blogspot.com/) notified me that the bird, the Tufted Titmouse, loves to eat Luna Moths.  She usually only finds the wings of the moth after the Titmouse has made a snack of one of these moths.
  • A Moth Fly is also known as a Drain Fly because it inhabits many bathroom sink drains and is considered a nuisance.


Luna Moth (Actias Luna)

Luna Moth (Actias Luna)

Luna Moth Wing Detail

Luna Moth Antennae Detail

Rosy Maple Moth (Dryocampa rubicunda)

Banded Tussock Moth (Halysidota tessellaris)

Banded Tussock Moth

Unidentified Moth

Rosy Maple Moth

Grape Leaffolder (Desmia) with the tiny  Moth Fly (Psychodinae)
Unidentified Moth



5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Daniel, Is the dark moth with the light edged wings possibly a Nite moth?

Interesting head structure

http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=0946.97

Anonymous said...

Bottom moth looks close to

http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=6405

The Giraffe Head Tree said...

Amazing photos, Daniel. As usual, I love learning about nature via your blog. I miss you and your family - tell everyone hello!!!

Alexandra Radu said...

The colors of the Luna Moth really impressed me.It's the firts time I see one and now I am glad that I found your article.

Sherry B42 said...

Daniel, I'd like to contact you to request permission to use your photographs of the luna moth in an educational area of an art exhibit this summer (June-July 2013.) Is there a way to contact you? I'm at sbest@tscpl.org - please respond to that email. Thank you,
Sherry Best